140157090_1287777398269662_8818935764929

Photo in honor of Mark Williams (pictured), who lost his life serving the people of Frederick on February 1, 2021. 

Issues

Growth and Infrastructure

Many people don’t realize that Frederick is the second-largest city in Maryland! Boasting a population of approximately 74,000, according to current trends, Frederick is set to add more than 10,000 additional residents over the next decade. Growth is important—but it’s equally important that we grow in a way that conserves our City’s unique way of life. People move their families and businesses to Frederick because of its warmth, its beauty, and its historic, small-town feel. It’s paramount that no matter how much Frederick grows, we never lose that special something that makes Frederick unlike any other city in America. In order to do that, we must reform city planning, and strengthen the City’s Adequate Public Facilities Ordinances (APFO) policy to more fully meet Frederick’s current needs. The revisions made to the policy in 2019 only scratched the surface of what needs to be done to relieve our overcrowded schools and roadways.

After the Great Depression laid waste to the American economy in the 1930s, the country was brought back from the brink in large part by focusing on infrastructure. Similarly, after a year like 2020, Frederick would benefit by working hard on our infrastructure as well. Frederick is fortunate to be nestled between two major highways—I-270 and I-70—which brings major commercial activity to our region. In order to support and encourage more of this activity, as well as maintain a high quality of life for our residents, we need to repair our aging roads, sidewalks, and crosswalks. We would benefit from improving our City parks, where residents can gather safely, exercise, and enjoy our green spaces. And we would benefit from finding innovative ways to address our stormwater management issues, so that residents don’t have to worry about constant flooding in their homes and businesses. Like this nation did almost one hundred years ago, we can build a stronger, better city by focusing on infrastructure, the backbone of our community.